Montserrat: The Irish Connection

Montserrat is the southernmost island of the Leeward archipelago in the Caribbean. The first distinctive stamp issues were stamps of Antigua overprinted ‘MONTSERRAT’ that were introduced in 1876. However, the island did not issue its own stamps until 1903 that featured the badge of Monserrat – a female figure embracing a cross, with her leftContinue reading “Montserrat: The Irish Connection”

Anguilla: Battle for Anguilla

Anguilla is one of the most northerly of the Leeward Islands in the Lesser Antilles, lying east of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands and directly north of Saint Martin. Dedicated postal stamp issues for the small Caribbean island begin in 1967 and celebrate its peaceful and colourful culture. However, a stamp issue of 1976 provides insight of the military battles fought on landContinue reading “Anguilla: Battle for Anguilla”

Bahamas: The Interinsular Stamp

The Bahamas post office became independent in 1859 following the publication of a report by the English novelist and civil servant, Anthony Trollope. The first distinctive stamp issue clearly identified that the mail posted externally from the Bahamas remained under the control of London. Despite full independence postal services just a year later, the ‘intersecular’Continue reading “Bahamas: The Interinsular Stamp”

Barbuda: On the Map

Barbuda is one of many small Islands in the Caribbean that form a chain known as the Leeward Islands. It is now part of the sovereign nation of Antigua and Barbuda, with Barbuda located just north of its larger sister island. The first stamp issues were released on 13 July 1922 – stamps of theContinue reading “Barbuda: On the Map”

The Bahamas: 1967 Definitive Issue

In 1966 the Crown Colony of The Bahamas introduced decimal currency, transitioning from the former imperial currency used almost extensively across the British Commonwealth, to The Bahamas dollars and cents. On 25 May, an earlier 1965 definitive issue was overprinted with surcharges in the new currency. Later that year, three commemorative issues celebrating the WorldContinue reading “The Bahamas: 1967 Definitive Issue”

Pitcairn Islands: Mutiny on the Bounty

The Mutiny on the Bounty is a well know tale of insurrection on the Royal Navy vessel HMS Bounty in the South Pacific on 28th April 1789. The mutineers seized control of the ship from their captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, setting him adrift in a launch with 18 loyalists. The story of Bligh’s navigation moreContinue reading “Pitcairn Islands: Mutiny on the Bounty”

St Lucia: Rising from the Ashes

Built on reclaimed land and tucked away in the north west of a tropical Caribbean island, Castries is the capital and largest city of St Lucia. It lies on a flood plain but on 19 June 1948 was devastating by a fire that destroyed more than 75% of the city and led to a reconstructionContinue reading “St Lucia: Rising from the Ashes”

Cayman Islands: Tempting the Tourists

Tourism has been a predominant theme for a number of recent posts relating to Caribbean issues on this blog – notably Martinique (The Unsinkable ‘Stone Frigate’), Jamaica (Local Artist Comes to the Rescue) and St Lucia (A Case of Unfortunate Timing). In the early 1930’s, these stamp issues were unashamedly targeting a small but wealthy audienceContinue reading “Cayman Islands: Tempting the Tourists”

Jamaica: Local Artist Comes to the Rescue

Jamaica’s 1932 pictorial definitives were issued to support the growth in tourism that was sweeping the Caribbean and bringing a much needed economic boost to the islands. The issue featured vignettes selected by the Government Printing Works who were unfamiliar with the stamp design process. Local artist, Stella Shaw, came to the rescue and deliveredContinue reading “Jamaica: Local Artist Comes to the Rescue”

Sarawak: Sir James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak – a life story worthy of film

Sarawak – a place name that has an exotic ring to it and its history is none the less interesting. British trading rights had been established in countries such as India and Malaysia and by the beginning of the nineteenth century, Singapore had become a major trading port. However, further east the influence was lessContinue reading “Sarawak: Sir James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak – a life story worthy of film”